IEEE Computer Society Wins 2016 APEX Award of Excellence
 

LOS ALAMITOS, Calif., 21 July 2016 — IEEE Computer Society, the world’s leading membership organization dedicated to computer science and technology, received the APEX 2016 Award of Excellence in the “Magazines, Journals & Tabloids — Electronic” category for IEEE Software, the authority on translating software theory into practice.

APEX 2016 — the 28th Annual Awards for Publication Excellence — is an international competition that recognizes outstanding publications from newsletters and magazines to annual reports, brochures, and websites.

According to the APEX 2016 judges, “The awards were based on excellence in graphic design, quality of editorial content and the success of the entry in conveying the message and achieving overall communications effectiveness.”

IEEE Software magazine offers pioneering ideas, expert analysis, and thoughtful insights for software professionals who need to keep up with rapid technology change,” says Evan Butterfield, the Computer Society’s Director of Products & Services. “It’s the recognized authority on translating software theory into practice, and its issues feature videos, podcasts, and interactive graphics. We couldn’t be prouder that Software has received this prestigious award. It’s the well-deserved result of a lot of hard, creative work by authors and volunteers — especially Diomidis Spinellis, Software‘s editor in chief — supported by our professional staff.”

IEEE Software‘s mission is to build the community of leading software practitioners,” says Software’s editor in chief Diomidis Spinellis.  “We strive to do this by publishing research results that practitioners can readily apply to their everyday problems. The magazine’s articles are complemented by regular blog postings (http://blog.ieeesoftware.org) and the popular (SE Radio podcast). The APEX award recognizes the work of the magazine’s amazing volunteer and staff team.”

The winning issue for IEEE Software was the November/December 2015 issue, with its focus on refactoring, the process of improving a program’s source code without changing its external behavior. Contributors to this special issue include William G. Griswold and William F. Opdyke, whose separate PhD dissertations contained the initial research that led to refactoring becoming a standard practice.

The issue looks at how far refactoring has come since then and addresses industry perspectives on the adoption of refactoring, refactoring for software on mobile devices, and lessons from the trenches on database refactoring. The popular “Point/Counterpoint” column provides two opposing viewpoints: one from John Brant that “Refactoring Tools Are Trustworthy Enough” and one from Friedrich Steimann that “Trust Must Be Earned.”

In addition, the issue includes a column by IBM Fellow Grady Booch, one of UML’s original authors, titled “I, for One, Welcome our New Computer Overlords,” in which he discusses how fears regarding the rise of super intelligent machines are at best unfounded and at worst misleading.

The winning issue also includes discussions about the potential of connected cars; how scientists at NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory ensure they understand the limitations of resources such as time, stacks, queues, and file systems to ensure the production of reliable software; and whether advances in software in computing will evolve humankind to Humanity 2.0 or a post-human society.

IEEE Software magazine offers pioneering ideas, expert analyses, and thoughtful insights for software professionals who need to keep up with rapid technology change. It’s the authority on translating software theory into practice, and features embedded multimedia, including videos, podcasts, and interactive graphics.